1w ago
       

What does Martian wind sound like? Now we know

InSight, or NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport lander, provided the first "sounds" of Martian winds to human ears on Friday. An external seismometer which will be deployed by InSight’s robotic arm, took in the vibrations caused by wind blowing over InSight's solar panels. It's like InSight is cupping its ears and hearing the Mars wind beating on it.
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2w ago
       

Lyft heads for initial public offering

Lyft still hasn't caught up to Uber in the rapidly growing ride-hailing market, but it's ahead in the race to sell its stock on the public market where the two companies could potentially raise billions to help finance their expansion. Getting a head start with its IPO will allow give Lyft a "first-mover advantage" over Uber and help steer investor expectations about the growth and moneymaking potential of ride-hailing services, said Rohit Kulkarni, managing director of SharesPost, which focuses on privately held companies going public. Although Lyft still ranks a distant second, it has been gaining market share during the past two years as Uber faced a backlash following revelations of rampant sexual harassment within its ranks , a cover-up of a major computer break-in , allegations of high-tech thievery and a fatal collision involving one of its robotic cars.
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1m ago
       

Rare conservation win: Mountain gorilla population ticks up

"In the context of crashing populations of wildlife around the world, this is a remarkable conservation success," said Tara Stoinski, president and chief scientist of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund. Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund via AP, FILE A group of mountain gorillas in Rwanda's Volcanoes National Park in 2014. Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund via AP A young mountain gorillas named Fasha, who has faced a number of challenges in her young life, including having been caught in a snare in the past, lies in the grass in Rwanda's Volcanoes National Park in 2016.
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1m ago
       

How 'net neutrality' became a hot-button issue

Law professor Tim Wu, now at Columbia University, coined the term "net neutrality" in 2003 to argue for government rules that would prevent big internet providers from discriminating against technology and services that clashed with other aspects of their business. Yet on net neutrality, these tech companies got to be the "good guy," siding on the side of the younger "digital first" generation and consumer groups calling for more protection. And a Democratic takeover of the House in Tuesday's midterm elections could revive efforts to enact net neutrality into federal law, though Trump would likely veto any such attempts.
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2m ago
       

Report: Efforts to suck carbon from air must be ramped up

The nation needs to ramp up efforts to suck heat-trapping gases out of the air to fight climate change, a new U. S. report said. Last year the world put nearly 37 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the air, and emissions have been rising. The 370-page report called for the nation to invest in technologies and methods that would remove the heat-trapping gasses like carbon dioxide from the atmosphere that are generated from human activities like burning coal and natural gas for electricity, or burning gasoline and diesel for transportation.
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2m ago
       

AP Exclusive: Toxic metal found in chain stores' jewelry

No laws address cadmium in adult jewelry, however, and last year the center decided to check those products. Lab testing found 31 adult jewelry items purchased from retail stores were at least 40 percent cadmium, and most were more than 90 percent, according to results shared exclusively with the AP. The Center for Environmental Health has long used California law to force companies to reduce levels of harmful materials in consumer products, including cadmium and lead in jewelry.
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2m ago
       

Russia dismisses suspected spy actions as routine Dutch trip

Last week, Dutch officials alleged that four agents of Russian GRU military intelligence tried and failed to hack into the world's chemical weapons watchdog, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. Dutch defense officials on Thursday released photos and a timeline of the GRU agents' botched attempt to break into the chemical weapons watchdog using Wi-Fi hacking equipment hidden in a car parked outside a nearby Marriott Hotel. Speaking to the media outside the Russian Foreign Ministry building, Dutch Ambassador Renee Jones-Bos said, "We can't tolerate cyberattacks on international organizations," noting that Dutch officials made that clear last week.
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2m ago
       

Eek! Non-native venomous spider found living in Oregon

State officials confirm that a brown widow spider — usually found in South Africa, Florida and Southern California — has recently been found living in Oregon City, in the northwestern part of the state. Oregon already has black widow spiders. Valente says brown widows are subtropical and that Oregon's cold weather will likely kill them.
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2m ago
       

Red tide is plaguing beaches on both of Florida's coasts

Many of Florida's famous beaches were empty Thursday because of a red tide outbreak that for the first time in decades is plaguing both the Gulf and Atlantic coasts at once. In Florida's Panhandle, crews of county jail inmates are cleaning up piles of dead fish killed by a red tide bloom near Panama City Beach. Scott's announced aid was in the form of $3 million in grants from Florida Department of Environmental Protection for Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade counties to help mitigate the effects of red tide.
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3m ago
       

Half of killer whale populations in the world threatened by toxic chemicals: Study

The future of more than half of the world's killer whale population is under threat, in part, because of man-made chemicals produced throughout the mid-1900s leaching into the ocean, according to a new study. “A significant finding is that a single chemical class — PCBs — continues to threaten wildlife decades after their production and sale [has] ceased,” Peter Ross, co-author of the study and vice president of research at the non-profit organization Ocean Wise, told ABC News. The study found that the combined PCB effects on reproduction and immune function among 10 out of the 19 whale populations studied have the potential to prevent the long-term viability of orcas.
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